Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Use this forum if you have installed hMailServer and want to ask a question related to a production release of hMailServer. Before posting, please read the troubleshooting guide. A large part of all reported issues are already described in detail here.
User avatar
jim.bus
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 427
Joined: 2011-05-28 11:49
Location: US

Re: Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Post by jim.bus » 2020-05-12 23:02

palinka wrote:
2020-05-12 22:20
jim.bus wrote:
2020-05-12 21:53
Can't tell you how many times I forget to turn the headlights on in the day time when it rains (the headlight law is only a few years old and old habits die hard). Sheer stupidity.
My car has automatic lights (most/all new cars do). You can set it to the usual manual settings or to automatic. Of course, every time I work in the yard my little one jumps in the driver's seat and plays with every knob, button and switch, and I drive around for a week without even noticing the lights are off. :mrgreen:
Not sure if you understood what I was talking about. My car also has automatic headlights and those work just fine. I was referring to the computer's rain sensing function, which turns on the wipers automatically when it starts raining, does not automatically turn on the Headlights at the same time requiring you to manually turn on your Headlights if in the Daylight Hours when it is raining. At night time there is no problem because the Automatic Headlights turn on during Night Time hours or when it is Dark Enough for the sensor to detect it such as under a carport. The European Model of my car turns on the Headlights when the rain sensor turns on the wipers but not in the US. And my car incidentally is a 2013 model and my understanding was even the European 2013 Models turned on both when it was raining.

User avatar
SorenR
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 3703
Joined: 2006-08-21 15:38
Location: Denmark

Re: Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Post by SorenR » 2020-05-13 00:39

We are all "experts" in our own cars so may I start with this ...

This rebuild by MAT in Finland is right up the category "Hardcore Car Porn" for petrolheads ... 1,500+ pictures ...

http://www.mat.fi/gallery/65

A 305 bhp 2.1L 10V 5-cylinder engine.
Image

History:
Audi entered rallying as course car (Number 0) in the 1980 Algarve rallye (Portugal) driven by Hannu Mikkola. The job of the course car is to verify the course is driveable. Mikkola finished over 25 minutes faster than the race winner.

In the 1981 Jänner Rally (Austria) driver Franz Wittmann secured Audi's first unofficial WRC win. Second place car came in just over 20 minutes later.

The Audi Quattro was the first rally car to introduce both four-wheel drive (quattro) AND turbo. From that date no front- or rear wheel drive car won the the WRC title.

The original plan was to make 220 cars to be sold to the public in order to become homologated. Audi was overwhelmed by the demand and a total of 11.452 units were produced from 1980 to 1991, of which just 664 were sold in the US and an additional 99 in Canada. Engine was upgraded 2 times in the process from 200 bhp 2.1L 10V K-Jet CIS over 200 bhp 2.2L 10V Motronic EFI to 220 bhp 2.2L 20V Motronic EFI.

The production line in Ingolstadt - 46 senior workers built the cars by hand with the help of Baur Karosserie- und Fahrzeugbau GmbH in Stuttgart. Single shift 06:00 to 14:00, 5 day working week. Some time during 1985 engineers discovered that 8" rims could be fitted without problems so they changed the drawings to match the car :wink:

Once completed, each vehicle went through a test programme. The engine went through its own test cycle, and the suspension was electronically checked. Then it was run up to 160km/h on a test stand and driven for 60km on public roads around Ingolstadt - first on ordinary roads and then on the Autobahn, with a rev limit of 4000rpm or 185km/h. Then it went around an Audi test track to check the suspension. On each trip two stops were made to check fluid levels. Finally a rain test showered the car with 3500 litres of water for ten minutes.

Todays prices for a prestine and untouched series 1 "four eyes" is about 40-50.000 Euro. A new car in 1980 was 50.000 DM which roughly amounts to 56.000 Euro in todays money.

When Audi formed quattro GmbH (now Audi Sport GmbH) October 1983 they also ruled that from that date "quattro" was to be written with a lowercase "q". My car was built 1981 (1982 model) so I have the users manual with the uppercase "Q"'s :mrgreen:

Now the largely unknown tidbit about Audi is that a Dane, Jörgen Skafte Rasmussen, besides founding DKW he also also founded Audiwerke AG Zwickau for building his DKW cars. Long story cut short ... In 1938 Adolf Hitler arranged to pay Jörgen Skafte Rasmussen a kompensation equal to 5,3 million Euro and deported him back to Denmark.

Ein gleichmäßiger Zündabstand von 144 Grad bei einem Kurbelwellenkröpfungsversatz von 72 Grad samt Zündfolge 1-2-4-5-3 nehmen dem Fünfzylinder auch bei hohen Drehzahlen die Geburtsfehler ungünstiger Massenmomente und taumelnden Schwingungsverhaltens. Sie geben ihm jenen sonoren Stakkato-Klang, der Gänsehaut erzeugt. Man nennt diesen Klang auch quattrophonie.
SørenR.

“Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it.”
― Edmund Burke

User avatar
SorenR
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 3703
Joined: 2006-08-21 15:38
Location: Denmark

Re: Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Post by SorenR » 2020-05-13 01:06

jim.bus wrote:
2020-05-12 23:02
The European Model of my car turns on the Headlights when the rain sensor turns on the wipers but not in the US. And my car incidentally is a 2013 model and my understanding was even the European 2013 Models turned on both when it was raining.
Well... DRL has been a requirement in EU since 2011 so the EU version of your Lexus would turn on the headlights at the turn of the key. Rain or shine. Denmark introduced DRL in 1990.

EU of cause is a completely different beast. They fcuked up big time. DRL was percieved as driving lights (LED strip or headlights only). Many people could not really get that they needed to turn on the lights to get full lights on the car - "hey, I see fine" so we ended up with a truckload of cars not having their tail lights on. Law was changed in 2016 to include taillights but I still see a lot of cars with only headlights on.

I use rally bulbs in my headlights and my low beam stay on when flashing so it gives me a nice warm fuzzy feeling showing the fcukers some 380 Watts of H4 love right in their mirrors. :mrgreen:

90% of then never get it :roll:
SørenR.

“Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it.”
― Edmund Burke

User avatar
jim.bus
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 427
Joined: 2011-05-28 11:49
Location: US

Re: Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Post by jim.bus » 2020-05-13 02:30

SorenR wrote:
2020-05-13 01:06
jim.bus wrote:
2020-05-12 23:02
The European Model of my car turns on the Headlights when the rain sensor turns on the wipers but not in the US. And my car incidentally is a 2013 model and my understanding was even the European 2013 Models turned on both when it was raining.
Well... DRL has been a requirement in EU since 2011 so the EU version of your Lexus would turn on the headlights at the turn of the key. Rain or shine. Denmark introduced DRL in 1990.
But in the US the Daytime Running Lights (I guess DRL in your terminology) can be disabled using the User Customizable Options. I saw documentation or perhaps the Lexus Service Manager (can't remember which) which stated the Rain Sensors in addition to turning on the wipers also turned on the Headlights. But either way to add the Headlights turned on with Wipers is merely a couple lines of source code in the Firmware and not a hardware modification.

palinka
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 2012
Joined: 2017-09-12 17:57

Re: Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Post by palinka » 2020-05-13 03:03

SorenR wrote:
2020-05-13 00:39
We are all "experts" in our own cars so may I start with this ...

This rebuild by MAT in Finland is right up the category "Hardcore Car Porn" for petrolheads ... 1,500+ pictures ...

http://www.mat.fi/gallery/65
Missing a couple of bolts there. :lol:

They say you're really happy if you put the thing back together without any leftover bolts. That's why I always sweep up before finishing. So I can be happy too! :mrgreen:

But seriously, that's why I love woodworking. No matter how badly I screw something up, a little creativity can turn it back into something really nice.

My brother is an airplane mechanic and metalworker. He told me his boss from several jobs back would measure everything the guys milled. If you're off by 1/1000 of an inch, he would whip out his playbook joke: "Sloppy - you think you're a carpenter?"

He's pretty good. He made me a turners cube from a block of aluminum. If you don't know what that is, grab a beer and google it. Trust me, you'll end up watching a few of those how-to-make-it videos.

User avatar
jim.bus
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 427
Joined: 2011-05-28 11:49
Location: US

Re: Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Post by jim.bus » 2020-05-13 03:45

palinka wrote:
2020-05-13 03:03
SorenR wrote:
2020-05-13 00:39
We are all "experts" in our own cars so may I start with this ...



My brother is an airplane mechanic and metalworker. He told me his boss from several jobs back would measure everything the guys milled. If you're off by 1/1000 of an inch, he would whip out his playbook joke: "Sloppy - you think you're a carpenter?"
Close only counts with hand grenades and nuclear bombs. Or do you need to use Floating Point registers for your calculations?

palinka
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 2012
Joined: 2017-09-12 17:57

Re: Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Post by palinka » 2020-05-13 04:15

jim.bus wrote:
2020-05-13 03:45
Close only counts with hand grenades and nuclear bombs. Or do you need to use Floating Point registers for your calculations?
Close is a relative term. I've thrown hand grenades, so I have personal experience with "close". Believe me, you don't want to be "close" - you want to be "on target". :D In construction, you get to really know the meaning of "tolerance" because nothing on earth or in space - not even the precision mirrors in the hubble telescope are perfectly flat, perfectly level, perfectly anything.

Imperfection is often added to offset perception.
The Parthenon is regarded as the finest example of Greek architecture. The temple, wrote John Julius Cooper, "Enjoys the reputation of being the most perfect Doric temple ever built. Even in antiquity, its architectural refinements were legendary, especially the subtle correspondence between the curvature of the stylobate, the taper of the naos walls and the entasis of the columns."[59] Entasis refers to the slight swelling, of 4 centimetres (1.6 in), in the center of the columns to counteract the appearance of columns having a waist, as the swelling makes them look straight from a distance. The stylobate is the platform on which the columns stand. As in many other classical Greek temples,[60] it has a slight parabolic upward curvature intended to shed rainwater and reinforce the building against earthquakes. The columns might therefore be supposed to lean outward, but they actually lean slightly inward so that if they carried on, they would meet almost exactly 2,400 metres (1.5 mi) above the center of the Parthenon[61]. Since they are all the same height, the curvature of the outer stylobate edge is transmitted to the architrave and roof above: "All follow the rule of being built to delicate curves", Gorham Stevens observed when pointing out that, in addition, the west front was built at a slightly higher level than that of the east front.[62]
It is not universally agreed what the intended effect of these "optical refinements" was. They may serve as a sort of "reverse optical illusion."[63] As the Greeks may have been aware, two parallel lines appear to bow, or curve outward, when intersected by converging lines. In this case, the ceiling and floor of the temple may seem to bow in the presence of the surrounding angles of the building. Striving for perfection, the designers may have added these curves, compensating for the illusion by creating their own curves, thus negating this effect and allowing the temple to be seen as they intended. It is also suggested that it was to enliven what might have appeared an inert mass in the case of a building without curves. But the comparison ought to be, according to Smithsonian historian Evan Hadingham, with the Parthenon's more obviously curved predecessors than with a notional rectilinear temple.[64]

User avatar
jim.bus
Senior user
Senior user
Posts: 427
Joined: 2011-05-28 11:49
Location: US

Re: Is HmailServer for the likes of me?

Post by jim.bus » 2020-05-13 06:30

palinka wrote:
2020-05-13 04:15
jim.bus wrote:
2020-05-13 03:45
Close only counts with hand grenades and nuclear bombs. Or do you need to use Floating Point registers for your calculations?
Close is a relative term. I've thrown hand grenades, so I have personal experience with "close". Believe me, you don't want to be "close" - you want to be "on target". :D In construction, you get to really know the meaning of "tolerance" because nothing on earth or in space - not even the precision mirrors in the hubble telescope are perfectly flat, perfectly level, perfectly anything.

Just because I want to be nit picky and hopefully sort of funny. A telescope mirror is supposed to be curved not flat though the Hubble mirrors do need to meet very precise specs. And the actual joke went 'close only counts in horseshoes, hand grenades, and nuclear bombs' just so I tell the joke correctly though the original joke didn't have nuclear bombs in it but with today's weaponry, a nuclear bomb doesn't have to be very precise onto target.

Post Reply